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Crispy Quinoa Patties with Roasted Red Pepper Dipping Sauce

February 14, 2018

After visiting my grandkids last month, I’ve been thinking about healthy meals that are also toddler friendly. Quinoa is a perfect food for toddlers – a good source of good quality protein, delicious nutty flavor, and easily digested even if not chewed completely.  However, on its own, it can be a bit messy to manage by little hands.  These quinoa patties fit the bill perfectly. Delicious, nutritious and a finger food.  Perfect for adults too.

After serving Barbecued Beans with quinoa yesterday, I wondered what to do with the leftover quinoa. Then I remember this recipe from the Oh She Glows website. I used it for a cooking class back in September 2014, before this blog began.

You want your patties to be nice and firm, so they stick together well, so be sure to chop your veggies very fine – onions and kale – and grate the sweet potato with a small holed box grater. Chop your kale first thing, so it can stand about 40 minutes before cooking. (check out this video by Dr. Greger on sulfuraphane for an explanation) You can roast your red peppers for the dip while you let the kale sit.

The original recipe was already oil-free except for the oil packed sun-dried tomatoes. I substituted them with dried sun-dried tomatoes and pulverized them in the blender along with the rolled oats.  If using oil packed sun-dried tomatoes, drain and chop them fine.

The recipe calls for 3 tablespoons of flour, for binding. Since I cooked my quinoa yesterday, it was flaky and dry today and I did not need any of the flour to bind the patties. However, if your quinoa is on the moister side, you may need a tablespoon or two.

The recipe calls for fresh basil, which of course I don’t have in February. I used 1 tablespoon of dried (from my garden) and it provided a wonderful basil flavor. However, if you are not a fan of basil, you might want to reduce the basil by half.

For little dinner guests, I would suggest omitting the red pepper flakes. The recipe makes 12 –  1/4 cup patties.  For toddlers, make them half or even smaller for bite size portions. (watch the cooking time for smaller patties) If you want to use them for burgers, make them 1/2 cup size.

If you cook up 1 cup of quinoa, you should get enough cooked quinoa to make a double batch. These patties freeze wonderfully and the left overs are great for quick easy meals or snacks. As a bonus, the patties firm up even more after being frozen. If you are new to cooking quinoa, directions are below the recipe.

The patties are great with this simple roasted red pepper dip, but they are also good with ketchup. Served with a simple salad or raw veggie sticks for the little ones, this is a satisfying meal.

Crispy Quinoa Patties

• 1 1/2 cups cooked quinoa
• 2 tablespoons ground flax + 6 tablespoons water
• 1 cup destemmed and finely chopped kale
• 1/2 cup finely grated sweet potato
• 2 tablespoons finely diced onion
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, finely chopped
• 2 tablespoon runny tahini paste
• 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
• 1 1/2 teaspoons red or white wine vinegar
• 1/2 cup rolled oats(use certified gluten-free if necessary)
• 1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes (dried, not oil packed)
• 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
• 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt, or to taste
• 3 tablespoons gluten-free all-purpose flour or regular flour (only if necessary)
• red pepper flakes, to taste

Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
Chop the kale into very small pieces and set aside for about 40 minutes.

Mix the ground flax and water in a large bowl and set aside for 5 minutes or so to thicken.

Add the quinoa, kale, sweet potato, onion, garlic, basil, tahini, oregano and vinegar to the flax mixture and stir well. Add red pepper flakes if using (I used 1 tablespoon) Put the rolled oats in a blender along with the sun-dried tomatoes and salt. Blend until oats are ground to a flour. Add the sunflower seeds and pulse a few times to chop them but not pulverize them. Add to the quinoa mixture and stir well. If the mixture is too moist, add the flour, one tablespoon at a time until the mixture is firmed up and holds together. Using a ¼ cup measuring cup, scoop out ¼ cup of mixture and shape mixture into patties with wet hands. Pack tightly so they hold together better. Place on baking sheet.
Bake for 15 minutes, then carefully flip cakes, and bake for another 8-10 minutes until golden and firm. Cool for 5 minutes on the sheet. Enjoy immediately or for firm patties, freeze and reheat in a skillet.

To cook quinoa, rinse 1 cup uncooked quinoa in a fine mesh strainer. Place quinoa in a medium pot and cover with 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a low boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and then cover with a tight fitting lid. Simmer covered for 14-17 minutes until most of the water is absorbed and the quinoa is light and fluffy. Remove from heat, fluff with a fork, and then place lid back on to steam for another 4-5 minutes. Note that this makes almost 3 cups of cooked quinoa and you only need 1 1/2 cups for this recipe, so you will have leftover quinoa.

Roasted Red Pepper Dipping Sauce

I have never had much luck roasting peppers over an open flame as most sites demonstrate. Instead, I use an easier method I learned from an Italian friend, Sara. Place your whole red peppers in a covered baking pan and roast for about 45 minutes at 350F or until tender. Leave the lid on and let them cool until they are cool enough to remove stems and seeds. You can peel the skin off as well. Be sure to save the liquid from the pan and use it for soups or stock.

For this recipe, you could use jarred roasted red peppers but I roasted two large red peppers instead. After roasting, I removed the stem and seeds but did not peel. I threw the flesh and liquid into the blender along with the almonds, garlic, vinegar and salt.

I am not sure where I got this recipe from, but its delicious and super easy.

Roasted Red Pepper Dipping Sauce
• 1 ½ cups roasted red peppers, drained
• ½ cup whole almonds
• 1 clove garlic
• 2 tsp. red wine vinegar (more to taste)

Purée all ingredients in food processor until smooth.  Taste and add a pinch of salt and a bit more vinegar to taste.

 

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How Not To Die

February 8, 2018

I find “How Not to Die” an odd name for a book. After all, we are all going to die, someday.  However, this book by Dr. Michael Greger, outlines how not to die from preventable causes. I must confess, that although I have known about the book for a while (Dr. Greger was a guest lecturer for the Plant Based Nutrition Certificate course I took), I refused to read it just because I did not like the title – until recently. Apparently, I was meant to read the book, as the universe sent Dr. Greger to me.

Katherine, Dr. Michael Greger and myself

I was thrilled when I learned that Dr. Greger would be speaking in Manitoba, and even more thrilled that the event was sponsored by The Wellness Institute.  The Wellness Institute is affiliated with, and attached to,  the Seven Oaks General Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba. For a hospital associated organization to sponsor a talk on using whole food plant based nutrition to heal is big news in my books.  Perhaps the science on plant based nutrition is beginning to be recognized by the medical community.

Apparently, tickets to How Not To Die where the hottest tickets in town last week. Only 140 tickets were available to the event, and they sold out quickly. Luckily, my friend Fran is a member at the Wellness Institute and gave me the heads up as soon as they were released. I attended the talk with friends Fran, Theresa and Katherine.  Dr. Greger is a great speaker. Very humorous, personable and extremely knowledgeable. The talk, follow up question session, book signing and taste testing were fantastic. During book signing, Dr. Greger took the time to speak to each person in line, and even pose for pictures. He was very happy to hear of the Whole Food Plant Based Cooking Classes we are holding here in Winnipeg and happily agreed to let me post his picture on this blog.

The first thing I did after purchasing tickets to the talk, was to order the book How Not To Die. I am a bit of a geek, so of course I had to read up on the subject before attending the talk. Dr. Greger has an interesting story and a unique historical connection to the plant based movement through his grandmother.

The book is divided into two parts. The first section focuses on individual diseases and the research showing the effect of nutrition on the disease. How Not to Die from Heart Disease, How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure, How Not to Die from Lung Disease, How Not to Die from Diabetes and How Not to Die from Parkinsons are just some of the chapters.  A very lengthy foot note section at the back of the book provides the links to the scientific research behind the information provided (for a science geek like me that is important). These chapters are in depth and full of information, so much so that I would recommend reading only one chapter a day as it is heavy reading. By the last chapters I found myself skimming the research. However, it is a great resource book for your library when you are looking for info on a specific disease. I found it interesting to look at diseases that tend to run in my family – heart disease, Parkinsons, high blood pressure – and see what can be done to reduce the chance of these genes expressing.

The second section, is all about the food, with a chapter on each of Dr. Greger’s ‘Daily Dozen’ food groups. The Daily Dozen is the foods that Dr. Greger himself tries to consume each day. This was the my favorite part of the book – real down to earth practical advise on how to eat well. The Daily Dozen focuses on what you should strive to eat daily.  I love the checklist and have been incorporating it into my everyday routine. Beans, Berries, Other Fruit, Cruciferous Veggies (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, etc), Green Leafy Veggies, Other Vegetables, Flax, Nuts, Spices, Whole Grains, Beverages and Exercise. On a daily basis you can check your list and see how you faired.

Dr. Greger is the founder of the website NutritionFacts.org which reviews new scientific research on nutrition and provided the ‘Coles Notes’ version for you. It free and provides over 2,000 videos on health and nutrition topics. Its a great site to bookmark for where to go for scientific based information rather than relying on the sometimes questionable opinion based information available on the internet.

I have been a vegetarian for almost 40 years, solely plant based for seven years, and whole food plant based for three years. My diet was already heavy in beans, whole grains, greens, veggies, fruit and nuts. What more can I do to improve my diet? I found out there is still room for improvement. Since reading the book I am:

  • Reducing the salt in my diet.
  • Eating more legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas, etc , making sure I get two or three servings of them every day not just every week.
  • Making sure I get at least one serving of cruciferous veggies each day – usually cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, or kale. (read the book to get fascinating info on how to prepare crucifers to preserve the cancer fighting properties)
  • Getting at least two serving of leafy greens every day, in a smoothie, salad or steamed greens
  • Making sure I get at least one serving of berries each day. Since they are out of season now in wintery Manitoba, I am using frozen berries in my smoothies, chia puddings and cobblers. Before I would have berries in my smoothie once or twice a week.
  • Having 1 tablespoon of ground flax daily. I like to dissolve mine in lemon water and let it hydrate before drinking. Or add it to a smoothie.
  • Ramping up the spices, especially turmeric. Adding 1/4 tsp of turmeric to my daily smoothie is a fast and easy way to get more turmeric without eating Indian food every day. Herbs and spices in general are great sources of antioxidants and nutrients.

With plant based diets becoming more mainstream, it is good to focus on the quality of the diet rather than the label. After all, a diet of potato chips and coke is vegan but it is not healthy. And so many would like to improve their diets but don’t know where to start. Cutting out meat often leads to eating more carbs – bread, pasta and rice which are often refined, white and lacking fibre.  By reducing meat and dairy consumption and increasing beans, whole grains, veggies and fruit, you will be adding so much more fibre to your diet. And it turns out that fibre is not just good for regularity. It also serves as food for the good bacteria that inhabit your gut. These good bacteria are a vital part of your immune system. So eat more beans!

I would recommend reading the book How Not to Die by Dr. Michael Greger, despite the title. The first part on individual diseases is great reference information and the second part provides vital information on how to eat every day. I can’t speak for the companion cookbook, as I have yet to try any of the recipes. However, if the appetizers served at the talk are any indication, the recipes should be great. Check out the website NutritionFacts.org and also The Wellness Institute. In their introduction to Dr. Greger, the Wellness Institute stated that this talk was only the first of a series of talks on how to improve health and prevent disease. Hopefully Winnipeg will see more high profile nutrition experts in the near future.

 

 

 

Sweet Potato Brownies

January 31, 2018

Sweet Potato Brownies

I came across this recipe from Bosh TV and it has quickly become one of our favorite everyday desserts. Its not too sweet and loaded with nutrition, I like to think of it as part of the meal, not dessert. It is sweetened with a mixture of dates and maple syrup. For those of you who like things a little sweeter, you can increase the amount of maple syrup used. The original recipe calls for coconut oil, but I substituted almond milk instead with great results.

• 4 medium sized sweet potatoes (cubed & roasted for 35 mins) (about 2 cups mashed)
• 1 1/2 cups oats
• 10 medjool dates (pitted & chopped) (about 1 cup dates)
• 1 1/2 cups ground almonds
• 1 cup cocoa (or cacao) powder
• 1/2 cup maple syrup
• 5 tbsp almond milk
Icing
• 1/3 cup maple syrup
• 1/3 cup nut butter
• 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips or chocolate squares

• 1/4 cup cocoa powder

Sweet Potato Brownies baked and ready for icing

Make oat flour by blending 1 1/2 cup rolled oats in a blender or food processor until fine. Remove from blender or processor and add dates, sweet potatoes, maple syrup and almond milk to the machine. Blend until smooth. Add ground almonds, oat flour and cocoa and blend until smooth. (If your machine won’t handle this thick mixture, mix the dry ingredients in by hand). Spread the batter on a rimmed baking sheet (cookie pan) lined with parchment paper. Smooth top and bake at 350F for 45 minutes. Remove and cool to room temperature.

Make the icing by placing the maple syrup, nut butter (I use almond or peanut), and chocolate chips in a small pan and heat over low heat until chips are melted. Stir in cocoa powder.

Icing ready to spread

Spread over brownies. Refrigerate until icing is set. Slice into squares and freeze.

 

30 Days of Green

March 28, 2017

Its almost April and the snow is melting here in Manitoba. Soon everything will be turning green. And speaking of greens, have you had yours today?

Adding green vegetables, especially leafy greens, to your diet is, in my opinion, the single best thing you can do to improve your health. They are loaded with nutrients and antioxidants.

For the month of April, PlantPure Communities is challenging everyone to eat something green everyday. I hope you will take up the challenge with me.

Enjoy your greens in a green smoothie (some of my favorite green smoothie recipes are here), a salad (try this delicious Kale and Apple Salad), or cooked in an entrée (try this Red Lentil and Kale Soup).

You can post your pictures of you enjoying your greens on social media using the hashtag #30daysofgreen.

Homemade Vegetable Stock or Broth

March 20, 2017

I make a lot of soups, stews and chowders, especially during the cooler months. And I also use stock for sautéing veggies, instead of oil. As a result I go through a lot of bullion cubes. I always assumed making your own stock was a waste of good veggies. Many recipes call for onions, garlic, carrots, celery and leeks. You boil these until a tasty stock results then strain out the veggies and throw them out. Why not just make a veggie soup and eat the veggies???

A short while ago, I had a chance conversation with a friend of my daughter’s. Turns out he also follows a plant based diet and loves to cook. He shared with me his method for stock and it changed my opinion on homemade stock. The next day, I began saving veggies for my own stock making. Thank you Shain Brown. I am forever in your debt. (Check out Shain’s Not-Meat Loaf and Creamy White Bean Soup recipes as well.)

Shain’s question to me was, “What do you do with your vegetable scraps?” I compost them, of course. He challenged me, “Why not make a broth with them, then compost them?” Now that makes perfect sense.

Returning home after our conversation I was gung-ho to start my stock. For two weeks I threw every veggie scrap into the pot. Almost nothing went in the compost pail.  It’s cold here in Manitoba right now, so I can keep my stock pot in the porch and the veggies stay frozen until I am ready to make stock. (You can store yours in a zip-lock bag in the freezer.) When the pot was over half full, I set out to make my stock. The result was not bad but not as good as I had hoped. I consulted Google and found that some veggies can produce a bitter broth, namely the crucifers – broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, Brussell sprouts. Quite a few of those had made it into my stock pot.

For my second batch, I was more choosy on my veggie scraps, opting for the trimmings from onion , tomato , garlic , carrot , parsnip , celery and leek. After a couple of weeks, I had enough to try again. Eureka! It was delicious. I am hooked on homemade stock now. If you are not convinced, read the ingredients on the box of your favorite bullion cubes. I used an organic, non-GMO boullion cube and the first ingredients are: corn starch, salt and palm oil. All of these before any veggies are listed. None of these in homemade stock.

I have now finished cooking my fourth batch of stock, still mostly the basic veggies – onion, garlic, leek, carrot, parsnip, celery and tomato.  (Mushroom stems can also be used, but I seldom have any to throw into the pot.)  I also add the insides of one jalapeño pepper (the pith and seeds left when you slice of the outer flesh). It gives the stock just the slightest hint of spiciness. But limit it to one pepper unless you want a spicy stock. Two makes a pretty fiery stock!

A few ground rules in making stock. Don’t use any veggie that you wouldn’t throw into a soup – that is, nothing dirty or rotten. Scrub your carrots and wash you leek and celery trimmings well to remove any dirt. Avoid cruciferous veggies (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, Brussel sprouts). Also they say potatoes, sweet potatoes and squashes will result in a cloudy stock. However, I now add small amounts of sweet potato and squash trimmings just because I love the flavor they bring. You can also add herb trimmings in small amounts – rosemary, thyme, oregano, parsley, basil, but keep in mind how you use your stock and if these flavors will complement. You may not want a strong rosemary flavor in every soup you make. However, a handful of parsley or cilantro stems makes a good addition. A bay leaf is also a good addition to the pot, as is a pinch of peppercorns. I have also added the remnants after squeezing one organic lemon. It gave the stock a mild bit of zip.

You can add salt or not, depending on your preference. I prefer no salt in the stock, instead adding it to the final product to the desired degree. In my last batch I added a teaspoon of no-salt seasoning (like Mrs. Dash).

Watch this good video clip on making broth from scraps.

Vegetable Stock

  • clean vegetable trimmings – onion, garlic, leek, carrot, parsley, celery, mushroom, tomato
  • optional – small amount of sweet potato or squash trimmings
  • small amounts of herb trimmings – parsley, rosemary, thyme, oregano, etc (optional)
  • water
  • bay leaf, peppercorns (optional)

Save your vegetable trimmings and freeze until you have at least a few litres of trimmings. (Keep a plastic bag in the freezer for trimmings.) When you slice an onion, save the top and bottom you slice off as well as any fleshy leaves you peel off. The dry outer skin can be used in small amounts as it makes the broth darker. When you use garlic, save the bottom heal part you generally cut off. You can also add the garlic skins.  With leeks, wash well and toss in the top green parts you usually throw away.

When you are ready to make stock, place the trimmings in a large pot and add water to fully cover the veggies. Throw in a bay leaf and some peppercorns if desired. Bring to a boil and gently simmer for several hours. (about 5 hours) A crock pot set on low and simmered for 12 hours or more will also work. When the veggies are very soft turn off the heat and let the stock cool. Once cool, strain out the veggies. Taste the stock and if desired, you can continue to simmer the stock to reduce it to make a stronger, more concentrated stock. Compost the veggies.

Finish broth, with head space for freezing

Store the stock in containers in the fridge or freezer. If freezing, leave at least 1 inch of head space in the jar for expansion during freezing or your container will crack. You can also freeze the stock as ice cubes if you often use small amounts, or if you have made a very strong, concentrated stock. I like to keep one jar in the fridge at all times for oil free veggies sautéing,  If you are planning on making soup, take a few jars out the night before to thaw or place sealed jars in warm water to speed thawing. (Warm water not hot, as you don’t want glass jars to crack due to sudden temperature change)

 

 

 

 

Creamy White Bean Soup

March 19, 2017

This super simple, creamy soup is another recipe from Shain Brown. Its a basic recipe for a hearty filling soup that can be modified so many ways.

You can buy white beans (also called navy beans) in a can, but it is super simple to cook them from dry beans. And there are benefits to using dry beans – no BPA from the can, cheaper (about 50% cheaper), smaller carbon footprint (dry beans are lighter to transport than cans full of water)…and you don’t have to lug those heavy cans home after shopping or recycle them later.

One cup of dry beans makes three cups of cooked beans. Step 1 below outlines how to cook beans from scratch by soaking them first, then cooking. (You can cook the beans without soaking first, but soaking will remove more of the compounds that cause the gas issues common with bean consumption.)

I like to cook up a big batch of beans and then freeze the drained beans on cookie sheets. Once frozen , store in ziplock bags and whenever you need them for a recipe you can easily remove how much you need.

Shain’s basic recipe starts with dry beans, but you can easily substitute already cooked beans. I was out of frozen cooked white beans, so I cooked up another big batch to restock my freezer. If your beans are already cooked, you will skip Step 1 and start at Step 2.

I love this soup as it is so versatile. All you really need is white beans, and the rest you can modify. I had a leek in the fridge and some leftover squash that I added to the soup (in Step 2). I also added smoked paprika and liquid smoke to create a bacony flavor. Use your imagination and whatever you have in the fridge to create your own version.

Basic Creamy White Bean Soup

  • 1 cup dry white beans (or 3 cups cooked, or 2 15 ounce cans)
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 cups sliced mushrooms (I used cremini)
Cooking white beans

Step 1 – If using dry beans, soak the beans overnight. (In a hurry, no problem. Cover the beans with water and bring to a boil. Boil for 2 minutes then remove from heat, cover and let sit 1 hour. You will get the same results as soaking overnight.)

Drain soaked beans and place in a large pot with about 6 cups of water. Bring to a boil and then gently simmer until the beans are tender but not mushy, about 1 hour. Drain beans. You should have about 3 cups of cooked beans.

 

 

Beans, leeks, squash and garlic simmering

Step 2 – Add vegetable broth, and garlic to the cooked beans. Simmer 10 to 15 minutes.

You can vary the soup up by adding other veggies at this point. I added one chopped leek and 1 cup of butternut squash. The squash gave the soup a nice golden color. You could also add diced carrots, sweet potatoes or onions at this point as well. Cook until your veggies are tender.

 

 

 

Puree using an emersion blender

Step 3 – Using an emersion blender, puree the beans until smooth.

Alternatively, you can puree the beans in a blender. Let the mixture cool slightly and be sure to vent the container to let the steam escape.

If you are not a fan of pureed soups, the soup is also delicious left chunky.

Taste the soup and add salt and pepper to taste. For a smokey bacon-like taste, add a teaspoon of smoked paprika and a dash of liquid smoke, if you have it. If you like it spicy, add a 1/4 teaspoon of chipotle chili powder as well.

 

Step 4 – Dry fry mushrooms in a large non-stick frying pan on medium heat. Stir often and cook until nicely browned and slightly crispy.

To add a bit more texture and color to the soup, you can also dry fry up some diced onion and red pepper and add it to the soup.

The soup is also good with finely chopped kale in it. Add it after pureeing and let it simmer for 5 minutes to cook the kale.

Thin the soup out with additional broth or water to your desired thickness.

Step 5 – Serve soup with mushrooms on top. Or green onions.

 

 

Not-Meat Loaf

February 19, 2017

This recipe is came to me from Shain Brown, my daughter’s  hair stylist and plant-based chef extraordinaire. His method is unique, marinating mushrooms, onions and nuts to achieve a meaty texture. As a kid, I loved meatloaf sandwiches, so I was anxious to try it out. Shain did not disappoint. This Not-Meat loaf is moist, ‘meaty’ and delicious.

Best Ever Not-Meat Loaf
Best Ever Not-Meat Loaf

Shain’s basic recipe recipe is delicious just as it is. However, its a ‘meat’ loaf, not a cake, so feel free to have some fun and change it up anyway you want. In my second ‘meat’ loaf attempt, I modified his basic recipe by reducing the nuts to 1 cup and adding mashed chickpeas. I like the texture mashed chickpeas add. (Mash your chickpeas with a fork or potato masher till flaky in texture. Don’t mash to a puree.) I also doubled the onion, added garlic and double the veggies. For veggies I used a mixture of shredded carrots, finely chopped celery and red pepper. I also doubled the avocado. The new version was also delicious. In fact, not sure which I like better.

These recipes are very versatile. You can bake in the traditional loaf pan or, for individual loaves, press the mixture into silicone muffin tins (or line regular muffin tins with parchment paper cups).  If you prefer a drier crispier “meat loaf”, press the mixture into a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper. After baking, cut the sheet into squares. You can also use the mixture to make burgers or not-meat balls.

If your loaf comes out to moist on the inside, don’t despair.  Fry up the slices in a non-stick pan until crispy.

Serve the loaf slices with mashed potatoes and gravy for a plant based version of a very traditional meal. (Try the gravy from our November Cooking Class) This loaf also makes an excellent sandwich filling. Great with pickle or relish, onion and lettuce.

Experimenting with the recipe yielded a lot of meat loaf to eat. But you will be happy to know it freezes beautifully. Slice up the left overs and freeze on a baking sheet. Once frozen, place the slices in a freezer bag for a quick supper or sandwich filling.

Thanks for the recipe Shain. I have also been working on Shain’s stock recipe which I hope to be posting soon. Stay tuned.

 Shain’s Basic Not-Meat Loaf

  • 2 cups mushrooms
  • 2 cups pecans (or 1 cup walnuts and 1 cup pecans)
  • ½ onion
  • 4 tbsp soy sauce
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 4 tbsp ground flax
  • ¾  cup water
  • 1 green onion, diced fine
  • 1 ½ cups bread crumbs (or 1 cup bread crumbs and ½  cup rolled oats)
  • ½  ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and mashed)
  • 1 cup mixed veggies
  • 1 small can lentils, rinsed and drained (optional)
  • ¼ cup barbecue sauce
Onion, pecans, mushrooms
Onion, pecans, mushrooms

Dice mushrooms, pecans and onions small. Put in a bowl and add the soy sauce and pepper. Marinate overnight.

In a small bowl, mix the flax and water and let sit overnight or for at least 30 minutes, until the mixture forms a thick gel.

Shredded carrots, diced celery and yellow pepper, mashed avocado
Shredded carrots, diced celery and yellow pepper, mashed avocado

The next day, line a loaf pan with parchment paper.  In a large bowl mix pecan mixture, flax mixture, green onion, bread crumbs, avocado, veggies and lentils, if using. Mix until well combined and pack into the prepared loaf pan. Top with your favourite barbecue sauce. Let sit for 1 hour to allow the dry ingredients to absorb the moisture.

Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes uncovered. Remove from oven and let sit a minimum of 15 minutes before serving.

Not-Meat Loaf ready for baking
Not-Meat Loaf ready for baking

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chickpea Not-Meat Loaf

  • 2 cups mushrooms, diced fine
  • 1 cup pecans (or ½  cup walnuts and ½  cup pecans), chopped fine
  • 1 onion, diced fine
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 tbsp soy sauce
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 4 tbsp ground flax
  • ¾  cup water
  • 1 green onion, diced fine
  • 1 ½ cups bread crumbs (or 1 cup bread crumbs and ½  cup rolled oats)
  • 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and mashed)
  • 2 cups finely shredded or chopped veggies (carrots, celery, peppers, etc or frozen mixed veggies)
  • 1 ½ cup (1 can) cooked chickpeas, mashed (or substitute cooked lentils),drained and rinsed
  • ¼ cup barbecue sauce

Dice mushrooms, pecans and onions small. (Do not use a food processor for the pecans as they will chop too fine. You want some texture. Chop by hand or use a hand food chopper. Onions and mushrooms can be done in a hand chopper as well.)  Put in a bowl and add the garlic, soy sauce and pepper. Marinate overnight or for at least 4 hours. (Note, you can also add the mashed chickpeas to the mixture and let marinate overnight.)

In a small bowl, mix the flax and water and let sit for at least 30 minutes, until the mixture forms a thick gel.

Line a loaf pan with parchment paper.  In a large bowl mix pecan mixture, flax mixture, green onion, bread crumbs, avocado, veggies and chickpeas, if not already added.  Mix until well combined. Taste and adjust the seasonings to your liking, adding more soy sauce or pepper. Pack into the prepared loaf pan.

Top with your favourite barbecue sauce. I used a quick sauce made from ¼ cup ketchup, 1 tsp apple cider vinegar, 1 tsp molasses, 1 tbsp Dijon, ½ tsp smoked paprika and a squirt of sriracha.

Cover with foil and let sit for 1 hour to allow the dry ingredients to absorb the moisture.

Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes uncovered. Remove from oven and let sit a minimum of 15 minutes before serving. The longer the loaf sits the more it will firm up.